2024 Conference Programme

We look forward to seeing you at the conference! This year’s conference features an array of sessions, including 8 workshops and tutorials, 6 panels, 163 paper presentations, and 52 poster presentations. The conference will also feature several networking opportunities, including 2 evening receptions and 9 coffee breaks. Lunches are self-organized. Here is a list of lunch venues nearby.

Note to Presenters: See Tips for Presenters. All presentations must be in person; we’re not able to support virtual presentations this year. If there is a change in the schedule, we will notify affected authors directly. If you see any discrepancies with the schedule, please email us.

You can print a copy of the schedule using this PDF file.

The Filter/Search option below allows you to search by session name, theme or authors. To see which papers are scheduled in each session, click on the desired session.

Tuesday 16 Jul 2024

8:30 am - 9:00 am Registration & Coffee

REGISTRATION 📋 & COFFEE ☕

Upper Gallery

Please budget enough time for conference registration. We encourage you to explore the campus map before your arrival

Tue 8:30 am - 9:00 am
Networking / Social

9:00 am - 10:30 am Morning Workshops Part 1

Workshop: Qualitative User Experience (UX) Research Methods for Social Media Studies

Angela M. Cirucci (Rowan University)D105A/B

This workshop will help attendees reimagine what academic, qualitative research can look like in the social media studies field. Because social media companies rely on industry-proven methods to create and maintain their apps, it behooves academic researchers to be more in-touch with these methods. The moderator, Dr. Angela Cirucci, as co-authored a textbook on critically adapted qualitative methods, and frequently teaches a related course as a Senior Seminar. Angela has also used variations of the presented methods in her own, published research. The main objectives for this workshop are as follows:

  1. Understand how social media industry research methods can be adapted for critical, academic applications;
  2. Design and pilot six different social media studies applying critically adapted qualitative UX research methods;
  3. Create a working prototype of a social media interface using the popular platform Figma.

Tue 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Workshops

Tutorial: Social Media Research Post-Twitter – Accessing Social Media Data for Quantitative Research

Philip Mai and Anatoliy Gruzd (Toronto Metropolitan University) & Felipe B. Soares (University of the Arts London)D109

One door closes, another opens. With Twitter API behind a paywall and Crowdtangle being deprecated by Meta, obtaining social media data for independent research in the public interest is becoming more challenging. This tutorial will show attendees how to systematically collect publicly accessible social media data for academic research via Communalytic. Communalytic is a research tool developed by the Social Media Lab for studying online communities and discourse. The session will include an overview of the available metadata for various social media platforms and a step-by-step guide on how to collect data via platform-provided public APIs – No coding experience is required. By the end of the session, attendees will know how to collect data from the following platforms for their own research projects:

  • Bluesky, 
  • Mastodon, 
  • Reddit, 
  • Telegram, and 
  • YouTube

Tue 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Tutorials

Workshop: Linking Survey and Digital Trace Data

Luke Sloan and Shujun Liu (Cardiff University), Tarek Al Baghal and Paulo Serodio (University of Essex) & Curtis Jessop (NatCen Social Research)D110

The workshop will explore the ethical and operational challenges around gaining informed consent for linking survey and social media data. This interactive session will be organized as follows:

  1. Sloan will facilitate the session, giving an introduction of the recent work that the team has conducted in this area.
  2. Breakout activity: In your experience, what do you think are the key drivers of likelihood to consent to data linkage? Group discussion and feedback.
  3. Liu will discuss recent work on the impact of privacy attitudes on consent to data linkage.
  4. Breakout activity: Does this align with your own area of research? Open discussion.
  5. Al Baghal will discuss an example of gaining consent to link survey panel and LinkedIn data.
  6. Breakout activity: Each group will be given a social media platform, and asked to consider whether it would be possible to achieve deterministic or probabilistic linkage. What data would you need to do either? Group activity.
  7. Serodio will discuss an example of gaining consent to link survey panel and Twitter data.
  8. Breakout activity: Informed consent questions – can you write a better example? Group activity.
  9. Jessop will preset qualitative research with the public and that underlying factors that influence the decision to consent.
  10. Breakout activity: Using what we’ve just discussed, how could we maximise consent rates? Is there a point at which this becomes unethical?

Tue 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Workshops

Workshop: Understanding Online Conspiracy Communities through Mixed Methods

William Lakin (University of the Arts London)D113

The main objectives for this workshop are two-fold:

  1. To present the unique insights gained from the thematic analysis of online forum discussions around the 2016 Pizzagate conspiracy theory; the analysis focuses on the mechanics of the world building processes that the forum users engage in, and the types of communication and rhetoric used to appeal to like-minded others. It revealed a complex online ecosystem, one in which the forum users fostered a space to express their fears and anxieties, bolster their individual and group identities and construct a preferred, alternative reality.
  2. To test the ways in which an art installation using interactive works can stimulate an embodied understanding of the processes of collective narrative construction. These works will be presented in an exhibition space at London College of Communications throughout the conference and take the form of photographs, sculptures and text appropriated from the online discussions around the pizzagate narrative (images of works available on request). The aim of this approach is to engage people in activities designed to provoke the interpretive and narrativising impulses typical of conspiracy culture through interactions with fragmented and ambiguous speech, images and objects.

The workshop will be headed by William Lakin and will be split into three sections: a presentation of the analysis findings on the Pizzagate forum discussions; a period of time to view and interact freely with the artworks; and a period for discussion and feedback at the end. On completion of this workshop the attendees will have gained detailed insight into a case study of the Pizzagate conspiracy theory and the world-building processes that conspiracy theorists engage in. These insights pay particular attention to the modes of communication used by this group – the rhetoric and identity-driven dialogue – and what this reveals about the motivations to engage in these practices. The attendees will also have actively engaged in activities which use new, creative and visual methods to communicate these insights. These activities centre around creating a space for an embodied understanding of these insights and propose alternative ways to understand the culture of conspiracy theorising.

Tue 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Workshops

10:30 am - 11:00 am Coffee Break

COFFEE BREAK ☕

Upper Gallery

Tue 10:30 am - 11:00 am
Networking / Social

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Morning Workshops Part 2

WORKSHOP: QUALITATIVE USER EXPERIENCE (UX) RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL MEDIA STUDIES

Angela M. Cirucci (Rowan University)D105A/B

This workshop will help attendees reimagine what academic, qualitative research can look like in the social media studies field. Because social media companies rely on industry-proven methods to create and maintain their apps, it behooves academic researchers to be more in-touch with these methods. The moderator, Dr. Angela Cirucci, as co-authored a textbook on critically adapted qualitative methods, and frequently teaches a related course as a Senior Seminar. Angela has also used variations of the presented methods in her own, published research. The main objectives for this workshop are as follows:

  1. Understand how social media industry research methods can be adapted for critical, academic applications;
  2. Design and pilot six different social media studies applying critically adapted qualitative UX research methods;
  3. Create a working prototype of a social media interface using the popular platform Figma.

Tue 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Workshops

TUTORIAL: SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH POST-TWITTER – ACCESSING SOCIAL MEDIA DATA FOR QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

Philip Mai and Anatoliy Gruzd (Toronto Metropolitan University) & Felipe B. Soares (University of the Arts London)D109

One door closes, another opens. With Twitter API behind a paywall and Crowdtangle being deprecated by Meta, obtaining social media data for independent research in the public interest is becoming more challenging. This tutorial will show attendees how to systematically collect publicly accessible social media data for academic research via Communalytic. Communalytic is a research tool developed by the Social Media Lab for studying online communities and discourse. The session will include an overview of the available metadata for various social media platforms and a step-by-step guide on how to collect data via platform-provided public APIs – No coding experience is required. By the end of the session, attendees will know how to collect data from the following platforms for their own research projects:

  • Bluesky, 
  • Mastodon, 
  • Reddit, 
  • Telegram, and 
  • YouTube

Tue 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Tutorials

WORKSHOP: LINKING SURVEY AND DIGITAL TRACE DATA

Luke Sloan and Shujun Liu (Cardiff University), Tarek Al Baghal and Paulo Serodio (University of Essex) & Curtis Jessop (NatCen Social Research)D110

The workshop will explore the ethical and operational challenges around gaining informed consent for linking survey and social media data. This interactive session will be organized as follows:

  1. Sloan will facilitate the session, giving an introduction of the recent work that the team has conducted in this area.
  2. Breakout activity: In your experience, what do you think are the key drivers of likelihood to consent to data linkage? Group discussion and feedback.
  3. Liu will discuss recent work on the impact of privacy attitudes on consent to data linkage.
  4. Breakout activity: Does this align with your own area of research? Open discussion.
  5. Al Baghal will discuss an example of gaining consent to link survey panel and LinkedIn data.
  6. Breakout activity: Each group will be given a social media platform, and asked to consider whether it would be possible to achieve deterministic or probabilistic linkage. What data would you need to do either? Group activity.
  7. Serodio will discuss an example of gaining consent to link survey panel and Twitter data.
  8. Breakout activity: Informed consent questions – can you write a better example? Group activity.
  9. Jessop will preset qualitative research with the public and that underlying factors that influence the decision to consent.
  10. Breakout activity: Using what we’ve just discussed, how could we maximise consent rates? Is there a point at which this becomes unethical?

Tue 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Workshops

WORKSHOP: UNDERSTANDING ONLINE CONSPIRACY COMMUNITIES THROUGH MIXED METHODS

William Lakin (University of the Arts London)D113

The main objectives for this workshop are two-fold:

  1. To present the unique insights gained from the thematic analysis of online forum discussions around the 2016 Pizzagate conspiracy theory; the analysis focuses on the mechanics of the world building processes that the forum users engage in, and the types of communication and rhetoric used to appeal to like-minded others. It revealed a complex online ecosystem, one in which the forum users fostered a space to express their fears and anxieties, bolster their individual and group identities and construct a preferred, alternative reality.
  2. To test the ways in which an art installation using interactive works can stimulate an embodied understanding of the processes of collective narrative construction. These works will be presented in an exhibition space at London College of Communications throughout the conference and take the form of photographs, sculptures and text appropriated from the online discussions around the pizzagate narrative (images of works available on request). The aim of this approach is to engage people in activities designed to provoke the interpretive and narrativising impulses typical of conspiracy culture through interactions with fragmented and ambiguous speech, images and objects.

The workshop will be headed by William Lakin and will be split into three sections: a presentation of the analysis findings on the Pizzagate forum discussions; a period of time to view and interact freely with the artworks; and a period for discussion and feedback at the end. On completion of this workshop the attendees will have gained detailed insight into a case study of the Pizzagate conspiracy theory and the world-building processes that conspiracy theorists engage in. These insights pay particular attention to the modes of communication used by this group – the rhetoric and identity-driven dialogue – and what this reveals about the motivations to engage in these practices. The attendees will also have actively engaged in activities which use new, creative and visual methods to communicate these insights. These activities centre around creating a space for an embodied understanding of these insights and propose alternative ways to understand the culture of conspiracy theorising.

Tue 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Workshops

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch Break

Lunch Break🥗 (not provided/self-organized)

off-campus

Here are some food options near the LCC

Tue 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm Afternoon Workshops Part 1

Workshop: Reframing Social Media Platforms as Fragile States

Caroline Haythornthwaite (Syracuse University), Philip Mai and Anatoliy Gruzd (Toronto Metropolitan University)D105A/B

* Due to the space limitation, this workshop is invite-only. For more details on how to apply for this workshop, please visit the workshop page.

Have you noticed how social media platforms behave like independent ‘states’? And have you noticed how fragile they can be compared to other institutions that impact people’s daily lives? As a citizen of a social media state, do you feel like you have input on their rules of behaviour, and equitable representation under the laws of these social states? Are they stable states? Can they support the basics of statehood: to provide services, security and protection for citizens, apply well-defined laws in a fair, equal, and consistent manner, and protect human rights? Or are they fragile, with governance challenged by the continuous need to update and derive new rules and protections driven by internal and external interests? What indicators can be used to assess the stability or fragility of these platforms and these social states?

If you have pondered any of these questions, we invite you to apply and join us in person on the afternoon of July 16, 2024. More details here.

Tue 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Workshops

Tutorial: Applying Spatial Econometrics to Analyzing Social Media Data

Abby Youran Qin and Wil Meyer Dubree (University of Wisconsin-Madison)D109

The main objectives of this tutorial are two-fold: (1) introduce spatial-sociological concepts (spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity) to communication scholars, and (2) offer a hands-on tutorial on applying spatial econometrics (including spatial error and lag models and geographically weighted regression) to analyzing social media data. Abby Youran Qin will introduce theoretical and methodological rationales behind spatial analyses and lead the tutorial on spatial econometrics. Wil Meyer Dubree will lead the tutorial on data preparation, especially aggregate-level variable filtering through supervised machine learning. Both will assist participants’ hands-on practices throughout the session. The audience will understand spatial sociology concepts, learn to perform spatial analyses with Python, and learn to incorporate spatial thinking to social media research.

Tue 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Tutorials

Tutorial: Research with the Meta Content Library & API

Christina Fan, Yair Rubinstein & Phil Edwards (Meta)D110

This session will introduce the audience to the Meta Content Library and demo new data fields and functionalities available in both the user interface (UI) and the API. The hands-on demonstration will deploy research use cases to demonstrate how the data from the API and the UI can be used to shed light on questions related to public interest topics. We will also provide an overview for how individuals and research teams can apply for access to these tools, as well as provide an opportunity to share feedback on our products and services.

Meta Content Library gives researchers comprehensive access to posts, videos, photos, and reels posted to public Pages, Groups, and Events on Facebook. For Instagram, the library includes content from public posts, albums, videos, and photos from personal, creator and business accounts. Robust metadata about each of these data types (e.g. view count, reshares, reactions, etc.) enables in-depth quantitative and qualitative analysis.

Tue 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Tutorials

Tutorial: Analysing Collocations within Large Social Media Datasets

Dan Heaton (University of Nottingham)D113

The main objectives of the tutorial are to provide practitioners in social media analytics with a deep understanding of corpus linguistics, with a specific focus on collocation analysis. The presenter, an expert in corpus linguistics, will guide participants through the intricacies of collocation and its applications in social media research. Participants can expect to gain proficiency in identifying and analysing collocations within large social media datasets, enabling them to extract meaningful insights from these discourses, particularly focussing on agency and power dynamics. To summarise, this tutorial will: Equip practitioners with advanced skills in corpus linguistics, developing expertise in collocation analysis. Ensure practical proficiency through hands-on exercises. Instil confidence for immediate application of collocation techniques, refining social media analytics with nuanced insights.

Tue 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Tutorials

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm Coffee Break

COFFEE BREAK ☕

Upper Gallery

Tue 3:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Networking / Social

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Afternoon Workshops Part 2

WORKSHOP: REFRAMING SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS AS FRAGILE STATES

Caroline Haythornthwaite (Syracuse University), Philip Mai and Anatoliy Gruzd (Toronto Metropolitan University)D105A/B

* Due to the space limitation, this workshop is invite-only. For more details on how to apply for this workshop, please visit the workshop page.

Have you noticed how social media platforms behave like independent ‘states’? And have you noticed how fragile they can be compared to other institutions that impact people’s daily lives? As a citizen of a social media state, do you feel like you have input on their rules of behaviour, and equitable representation under the laws of these social states? Are they stable states? Can they support the basics of statehood: to provide services, security and protection for citizens, apply well-defined laws in a fair, equal, and consistent manner, and protect human rights? Or are they fragile, with governance challenged by the continuous need to update and derive new rules and protections driven by internal and external interests? What indicators can be used to assess the stability or fragility of these platforms and these social states?

If you have pondered any of these questions, we invite you to apply and join us in person on the afternoon of July 16, 2024. More details here.

Tue 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Workshops

TUTORIAL: APPLYING SPATIAL ECONOMETRICS TO ANALYZING SOCIAL MEDIA DATA

Abby Youran Qin and Wil Meyer Dubree (University of Wisconsin-Madison)D109

The main objectives of this tutorial are two-fold: (1) introduce spatial-sociological concepts (spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity) to communication scholars, and (2) offer a hands-on tutorial on applying spatial econometrics (including spatial error and lag models and geographically weighted regression) to analyzing social media data. Abby Youran Qin will introduce theoretical and methodological rationales behind spatial analyses and lead the tutorial on spatial econometrics. Wil Meyer Dubree will lead the tutorial on data preparation, especially aggregate-level variable filtering through supervised machine learning. Both will assist participants’ hands-on practices throughout the session. The audience will understand spatial sociology concepts, learn to perform spatial analyses with Python, and learn to incorporate spatial thinking to social media research.

Tue 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Tutorials

Panel: Topic Modelling for Research on Social Media Platforms

Daniel Angus , Axel Bruns & Tariq Choucair (Queensland University of Technology); Fabio Giglietto (University of Urbino Carlo Bo); Kateryna Kasianenko (Queensland University of Technology)D110

The panel aims to: 1) make explicit the key conceptual and methodological benefits and limitations of topic models for research on social media data; 2). consider a better way forward that would not only involve doing topic modelling with new tools such as embeddings, Large Language Models (LLMs), and so on, but also include visual-first or interactive approaches that, while maintaining the scalability and ease of exploratory research that topic models offer, would be better aligned with the research objectives of various sociologically-grounded projects studying digitally networked spaces. The panellists will first discuss conceptual considerations involved in utilising topic modelling for research on social media platforms. They will address the fit of the notion of a “topic” for their respective studies that examine polarised discourses, citizen engagement with political campaigns, spread of false or problematic narratives, and practices of knowledge exchange and solidarity on social media. The speakers will then address methodological complications they have encountered with applying topic modelling as well as approaches that allowed them to address these complications.

Tue 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Panels

TUTORIAL: ANALYSING COLLOCATIONS WITHIN LARGE SOCIAL MEDIA DATASETS

Dan Heaton (University of Nottingham)D113

The main objectives of the tutorial are to provide practitioners in social media analytics with a deep understanding of corpus linguistics, with a specific focus on collocation analysis. The presenter, an expert in corpus linguistics, will guide participants through the intricacies of collocation and its applications in social media research. Participants can expect to gain proficiency in identifying and analysing collocations within large social media datasets, enabling them to extract meaningful insights from these discourses, particularly focussing on agency and power dynamics. To summarise, this tutorial will: Equip practitioners with advanced skills in corpus linguistics, developing expertise in collocation analysis. Ensure practical proficiency through hands-on exercises. Instil confidence for immediate application of collocation techniques, refining social media analytics with nuanced insights.

Tue 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Tutorials

6:00 pm - 10:00 pm Evening Social

Evening Social

Four Quarters Elephant Park

Tue 6:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Networking / Social

Wednesday 17 Jul 2024

8:30 am - 9:00 am Registration & Coffee

REGISTRATION📋 & COFFEE ☕

Upper Gallery

Please budget enough time for conference registration. We encourage you to explore the campus map before your arrival

Wed 8:30 am - 9:00 am
Networking / Social

9:00 am - 10:00 am Welcome Remarks

Welcome Remarks

Lecture Theatre A

Welcome Remarks

Wed 9:00 am - 10:00 am

10:00 am - 10:30 am Coffee Break

Coffee Break ☕ & Spin to Win 🎰

Upper Gallery

Wed 10:00 am - 10:30 am
Networking / Social

10:30 am - 12:00 pm Parallel Sessions 1

Online and Offline Communities (1)

D105A/B

Traversing Online Spaces: Communication Challenges and Experiences of Filipino MSM X Alters in Sexual Engagement and Social Networking | Jeffrey Rosario Ancheta*, Cyril T. Raagas, Niño P. Valencia & Christian Jay B. Dalumpines (Polytechnic University of the Philippines)

A Study of Danmu Culture in the Chinese Domestic Animation Fan Community | Jiahui Qi (University of Leicester) & Yaning Xiong (Lancaster University)

Beyond Infrastructure: The Digital Dimension of a Residential Block | Alice Roberte de Oliveira (University of Brasilia)

"Master" Social Architects: Black Twitter Users' Production of Time and Place Online | Cynthia N. McLeod (University of California, Santa Barbara) & Alisea C. McLeod (University of Chicago)

Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Online and Offline Communities

Anti-Social Behavior (1)

D109

Session Moderator: Harry T. Dyer (University of East Anglia)

‘Anti-Sexism’: Where Does it Exist, and how can we Computationally Define it? | Aditi Dutta, Susan Banducci & Chico Camargo (University of Exeter)

Assessing College Students’ Perceptions of Digital Dating Abuse and Associated Correlates | Melinda Weathers & Meghan Gangel (Western Carolina University)

The Harms of AirDrop Misuse: Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence in the Lives of Young Women | Nicolette Little (Sheridan College) & Tom Divon (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Exploring Online Experiences of Antigypsyism Among Young Roma: A Qualitative Investigation into the Spectrum of Hate Speech | Ileana Rotaru (West University of Timisoara) & Anca Velicu (Romanian Academy)

Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Anti-Social Behavior

Platform Governance and Regulation (1)

D110

Session Moderator: Jeeyun "Sophia" Baik (University of San Diego)

AI Bias and Diversity in Algorithm-Mediated Marketplaces | Lance YJ Park (Howard University)

Exploring Censorship Experiences of Feminist Activists on Social Media in the Context of China: Reactance Theory Applied to a Cross-Platform Comparison of Weibo and Zhihu | Jinman Zhang & Anabel Quan-Haase (Western University)

Social Media Ecosystems as Workplaces and Their Emerging Governance Over the Commerce of Erotic Content | Lorena Rubia L.R. Pereira Caminhas (University of Amsterdam)

The Definitional Creep: Payment Regulation of Platformized Sexual Content and the Moral Ordering of Online Sexuality | Val Webber (Dalhousie University) & Rébecca Franco (University of Amsterdam)

Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Platform Governance and Regulation

TikTok (1)

Lecture Theatre B

Session Moderator: Sadia Ehsan Cheema (Seton Hall University)

#AFringeMinority: Framing Collective Identity Within the 2022 Freedom Convoy Protests Through TikTok’s Platform Vernacular | William E. Hollingshead (Western University)

“That Should not be on There”: A Qualitative Investigation of Expectancy Violations of TikTok Content | Aubree A. Herman (Texas Tech University), Ansley M. George (University of Kentucky), Kaylie Butler (Lindsey Wilson College), Sydney Brammer (University of North Florida) & Narissa Punyanunt-Carter (Texas Tech University)

Analysing how Russian State-Controlled Content Circumvents TikTok’s Labelling Policy | Viorica Budu, Samuel Williams & Anneli Ahonen (Cardiff University)

Artifacts, Practices and Social Arrangements in News Content Curation on TikTok: A Study on the EU Elections | Carlos Entrena Serrano & Trisha Meyer (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
TikTok

Mis- and Disinformation (1)

Lecture Theatre C

Session Moderator: Axel Bruns (Queensland University of Technology)

"My First Thought was Africa": Gates Foundation as a Floating Signifier in Global COVID-19 Philanthropy Discussions on Twitter | Kateryna Kasianenko, Guangnan Zhu (Queensland University of Technology), Uttama Barua (University of New South Wales), George Gyamfi (Flinders University) & Shima Saniei (RMIT University)

Bots & Humans: The Role of Super Spreaders in the Conspiratorial Infodemic | Chun Shao (Marquette University) & Hazel Kwon (Arizona State University)

Cognitive Drivers of Misinformation Belief and Sharing on Social Media: A Cross-National Comparison | Michael Chan (Chinese University of Hong Kong), Cristian Vaccari (University of Edinburgh) & Masahiro Yamamoto (University at Albany)

Deplatforming Children’s Health Defense: Fighting Health Misinformation or Building a Reactionary Health Populism Movement? | Victoria J. O'Meara (University of Leicester), Jaigris Hodson (Royal Roads University), Anatoliy Gruzd (Toronto Metropolitan University) & Esteban Morales (Royal Roads University)

Wed 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Mis- and Disinformation

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch Break

LUNCH BREAK 🍜(not provided/self-organized)

off-campus

Here are some food options near the LCC

Wed 12:10 pm - 1:30 pm

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Parallel Sessions 2

Online and Offline Communities (2)

D105A/B

Session Moderator: Harry T. Dyer (University of East Anglia)

How Black Knitters Use Instagram to Change Narratives | Dana Williams-Johnson (Howard University)

Online Migration and the Reconstruction of a Sense of Community in Times of Crisis: The Case of Israeli Twitter Users’ Migration to Bluesky | Sofia Haytin (University of Southern California)

Digital Disconnection, Dependence and Agency in Brazilian Work Context | Thiago Álvares da Trindade (Universidade Federal de Santa Maria), Thomas Tufte (Loughborough University London) & Sandra Rubia da Silva (Universidade Federal de Santa Maria)

Gig Workers United in Anonymity: A Content Analysis of Popular Posts in Reddit Communities | Phuong Hoan Le & Yijing Wang (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Online and Offline Communities

Anti-Social Behavior (2)

D109

How Men Perceive Gender-Based Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse: Myths and False Beliefs | Yimin Chen, Esteban Morales (Royal Roads University), Chandell Gosse (Cape Breton University), Kaitlynn Mendes (University of Western Ontario) & George Veletsianos (University of Minnesota)

Impact of Online Harassment, Brahmanical Patriarchy, and Intersectional Discrimination on Women Journalists in India | Pragyaa Chandel (Dublin City University)

The Effects of Moral Disengagement: A Case Study of Anti-AAPI Hate in a COVID World | Adrienne Hall-Phillips (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Olivia D. Johnson (University of Houston) & Te-Lin D. Chung (Iowa State University)

From Beauty Tips to Diagnosis of Psychological Disorders: Content Analysis on Mental Health Discourse in Top Teenage Spanish Influencers’ Social Media Accounts | Mònika Jiménez-Morales (University Pompeu Fabra), Mireia Montaña (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) & Clara Virós-Martín (University Pompeu Fabra)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Anti-Social Behavior

Platform Governance and Regulation (2)

D110

Session Moderator: Scott Rodgers (Birkbeck, University of London)

‘We do not Marshal Your Feed’: How AltTech Platforms Conceptualise Safety | Paloma Viejo Otero (University of Bremen) & Rebecca Scharlach (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Unpacking Resistance in the Age of Platform Governance | Damien Renard (UCLouvain), Salla-Maaria Laaksonen (University of Helsinki), François Lambotte, Sophie Del Fa (UCLouvain), Jukka Huhtamäki & Erjon Skënderi (University of Helsinki)

Analyzing the Perceptions of Anti-Conservative Bias in Platform Content Moderation | Jeeyun Sophia Baik (University of San Diego)

Content Moderation Does not Respond to Autocratization: Quantitative Evidence From Transparency Reports of Twitter, Alphabet and Meta | Sergei Pashakhin (University of Bamberg)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Platform Governance and Regulation

Discourse and Public Opinion (1)

Lecture Theatre A

Backlash Against Discourses on Rural Racism | Adrian Yip & Rachel Keighley (University of Leicester)

Exploring Twitter Discourse on Safety Technology in U.S. Schools | Celia Chen & Lovely-Frances Domingo (University of Maryland College Park)

Fashion Retail and the Social Tightrope: A Three-Year Study of Social-Media Sentiment in the UK | James Lappeman, Nkosivile Madinga, Siphiwe Dlamini & Paul Egan (University of Cape Town)

Fierce Feminism or Farce? Unpacking Netizens’ Perceptions of the Party-State in the Gender Controversy on Chinese Social Media | Xiaoyi Liu (University College Dublin)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Discourse and Public Opinion

TikTok (2)

Lecture Theatre B

Session Moderator: Zoetanya Sujon (London College of Communication)

Cultures of Sex Advice: Examining TikTok Communities Around Sexual Health in the US | Facundo N. Suenzo & Annika Pinch (Northwestern University)

Dancing in Uniform: The Role of Thirst Trap Propaganda in Military Image Wars on TikTok | Marcus Boesch (HAW Hamburg) & Tom Divon (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

HickTok: Using Social Identity Theory to Understand Southern Liberal TikTok Creators | Jerrica T. Rowlett (Bryant University)

Life for a Man is Harder Than Life for a Woman: The Role of Affect and Reactionary Publics in the Articulation of TikTok Misogyny | Anita Fuentes & Silvia Díaz-Fernández (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
TikTok

Mis- and Disinformation (2)

Lecture Theatre C

Session Moderator: Michael Chan (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Disinformation as Bullshit: Concept, Cognition and Code | Paul M. H. Buvarp (Norwegian Defence Research Establishment)

Disinformation during the Corona Pandemic: Conspiracy Narratives and Counter Strategies on Instagram | Caja C. Thimm, Patrick Nehls & Yannik Peters (University of Bonn)

Facebook, Fake News, and Fanatics: Politics of Truth Making in the Global South | Abdullah Hasan Safir (University of Cambridge)

Gender-Based Health Disinformation Narratives. A Social Media Analysis of the HPV Vaccine Case in Italy | Lorella Viola (Vrije Universiteit)

Wed 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Mis- and Disinformation

3:00 pm - 3:20 pm Coffee Break

Coffee Break ☕ & Spin to Win 🎰

Upper Gallery

Wed 3:00 pm - 3:20 pm
Networking / Social

3:20 pm - 4:50 pm Parallel Sessions 3

Online and Offline Communities (3)

D105A/B

Unveiling Digital Narratives: A Comprehensive Analysis of Trans Women on YouTube in India | K. Kavitha & Nirmala Menon (IIT Indore)

‘Solidarity Across Borders’: Online Gender Activism and the Construction of a Middle East & North African Regional Public Space | Bronwen Mehta (University of Warwick)

Radical Conversations and Political Identity on Far-Right Telegram Groups: A Case From Peru | Elohim Monard, Carlos Dávalos, Wil M. Dubree & Diego A. Mazorra Correa (UW-Madison)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Online and Offline Communities

Politics and Policy (1)

D109

China Defenders From Abroad: Exploring Pro-China Foreign Political Influencers on Twitter | Leiyuan Tian (The London School of Economics and Political Science) & Fan Liang (Duke Kunshan University)

Asymmetric Polarisation on Facebook: How the Far-Right Promotes Destructive Polarisation in Brazil | Felipe B. Soares (University of the Arts London)

Risk Levels, Scientific Information, and Politics in Health Communication: A Study of Health Authorities and Public Engagement on Social Media Across Waves of the COVID-19 Pandemic | Nic DePaula (SUNY Polytechnic Institute), Noah Greco (Wayne State University) & Loni Hagen (University of South Florida)

Elite Polarization Online Mirrors Public Polarization in a Highly Polarized Context | Güneş Ertan, S. Erdem Aytaç (Koç University) & Doruk Sen (Istanbul Bilgi University)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Politics and Policy

Climate Change (1)

D110

Session Moderator: Jackie Raphael-Luu (London College of Communication)

Advertising the Heroes and Villains of Climate Change: Narratives in Sponsored Posts on Facebook and Instagram in the United States | Ned Westwood, Travis Coan, Saffron O'Neill & Iain Weaver (University of Exeter)

Mapping Networked Sponsorship Economy: An Analysis of Facebook Partnership Networks Related to Climate Change | Chamil Rathanayake (University of Strathclyde) & Daniel Suthers (University of Hawai'i)

Platform-Mediated Social Norm Contestation of Climate Change Publics on Instagram and Twitter | Nathalie Van Raemdonck, Ike Picone (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) & Jo Pierson (Universiteit Hasselt)

Visual Signatures of Climate Denial Discourse: Examining Multimodal Discursive Practices of Climate Denial and Other Conspiratorial Hashtag Communities on Instagram | Caroline Gardam (QUT)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Climate Change

Discourse and Public Opinion (2)

Lecture Theatre A

From Like to Protest: A Closer Look into How Social Media News Engagement Translates into Intention to Participate in Offline Protests | Florin Cepraga (University of Amsterdam)

From Turkey Towards the West: The Marketing of Out-Migration Through YouTube | Ugur Baloglu (Istanbul Gelisim University)

Mass Events and Collective Sentiment on Digital Platforms: Football’s Impact on Online Fan Discourse | Mark J. Hill (University of Kent) & Rafal Zaborowski (King's College London)

My Kid, Your Kinship?: Analyzing Feminist Discourse of 'Right to Surnname My Child' Debate on Douban, China | Yanping Guo & Xuemei Zheng (South China Normal University)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Discourse and Public Opinion

Digital Methods (1)

Lecture Theatre B

Beyond Twitter: Data Ethics in the Decentralized Social Media Landscape | Marco Waehner, Johannes Breuer, Annika Deubel (Center for Advanced Internet Studies) & Katrin Weller (GESIS)

Codesigning and Implementing a Social Media Risk Information Campaign With Land Managers in Australia to Reduce Social Media-Driven Injuries in the Natural Environment | Samuel Cornell, Amy Peden & Robert Brander (UNSW Sydney)

Recruiting Interview Participants on Chinese Social Media Platforms: Insights From a Study of HPV Vaccine Content on Sina Weibo | Jingyi Ji (University of Sheffield)

Sharing Sensitive Data for Internet Research: A Community Data Trustee for Digital Far-Right Studies | Jan Rau (Leibniz-Institute for Media Research), Nils Jungmann (GESIS), Moritz Fürneisen (Leibniz-Institute for Media Research), Gregor Wiedemann (Hamburg University) & Pascal Siegers (GESIS)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Digital Methods

Mis- and Disinformation (3)

Lecture Theatre C

Jump to Recipe? Context and Portability in Quali-Quantitative Approaches to Online Misinformation | Robert Topinka & Scott Rodgers (Birkbeck, University of London)

Networked Misogyny and Disinformation in Sexual Rumours: Investigating Antifeminist Strategies Against Victims’ Rebuttal on Chinese Social Media | Qiqi Huang (University of Macau)

Propaganda Amplification on Social Networking Sites: How Content Moderation Influenced Russia’s News Ecosystem on Facebook Since Russia's Full-Scale Invasion of Ukraine | Julia Kling & Serge Poliakoff (University of Passau)

Why do Political Influencers do Their Work? Examining Content Creators' Engagement With Pro-Marcos Narratives | Kara Ortiga (Macquarie University)

Wed 3:20 pm - 4:50 pm
Mis- and Disinformation

4:50 pm - 5:00 pm Mini Break

Mini Break

Wed 4:50 pm - 5:00 pm

5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Parallel Sessions 4

Apps and Experiences (1)

D105A/B

“You’ve Got Match”: Relationships in a Time of Dating Apps – The Case of Turkey | Gözde Cöbek (Kadir Has University)

Playing for Keeps: Exploring Users' Experiences With Gamification in Dating Apps | Veronica Valente (CIES_ISCTE-IUL)

Wrap Your Head Around it: Brazilian Users’ Algorithmic Imaginary of Spotify Wrapped | Vanessa Valiati (Feevale University), Ludmila Lupinacci (University of Leeds) & Felipe B. Soares (University of the Arts London)

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Apps and Experiences

Growing Up Online (1)

D109

Navigating Parenthood in the Digital Village: Unveiling the Distinctive Traits of Facebook Community Leaders | Lilach Gal, Tali Gazit & Jenny Bronstein (Bar-Ilan University)

Prospective, Directional Associations Between Social Media Intensity, Loneliness, and Anxiety Among Peruvian Adolescents During the COVID-19 Pandemic | Elizabeth Sherwin (Stanford University), Marjolein Barendse (Erasmus MC) & Lucía Magis-Weinberg (University of Washington)

What's Behind Teens' Clicks? Exploring the Role of Injunctive Norms, Safety Value, and Familiarity in Adolescents' Sharing of Misleading News | Francesca D'Errico (University of Bari), Paolo Giovanni Cicirelli, Carmela Sportelli (Università degli studi "Aldo Moro"), Giuseppe Corbelli & Marinella Paciello (Università Telematica Internazionale UniNettuno)

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Growing Up Online

Privacy, Security and Trust (1)

D110

“Every Time You Tried to Make an Objectively Good Decision for Your Privacy, it Tried to Persuade You Out of it”: How Teens Perceive Privacy Dark Patterns on Social Media | Dominique Kelly & Jacquelyn Burkell (University of Western Ontario)

Designing a Privacy-Protective Period Tracking Application Post-Dobbs | Danielle Citron (University of Virginia School of Law), Alexis Shore Ingber (Boston University) & Jon Penney (Citizen Lab, University of Toronto)

How Horizontal Privacy Regulation Influences Online Political Expression in Russia | Aysenur Dal (Bilkent University)

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Privacy, Security and Trust

Health and Wellbeing (1)

Lecture Theatre A

Exploring Medical YouTubers’ Parasocial Visual Cues in Their COVID-Related Videos | Shujon Naha, Seung Woo Chae, Noriko Hara & David Crandall (Indiana University)

#SupportLooksLikeThis: Investigating Instagram Conversations as a Support Mechanism For Health Promotion Among Black and Latina Students | Olivia D. Johnson (University of Houston) & Desmond Delk (Langston University)

#BodyPositivity on Social Media: Impact on Mental Health | Roshni Harish, Ana Merlo Gonzalez & Adrienne Hall-Phillips (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Health and Wellbeing

Panel: Queer Cultures in Transnational Digital Spaces

Lecture Theatre B

Yener Bayramoğlu (University of York), Łukasz Szulc (University of Manchester), Tanvi Ratnakar Kanchan (SOAS University of London), Joanna Chojnicka (University of Groningen), Daniele Metilli (University College London) & Beatrice Melis (University of Pisa & Gran Sasso Science Institute)

The panel addresses the ambivalences of contemporary queer cultures by zooming in on their intrinsic transnational and digital condition. The panel will demonstrate how LGBTIQ+ people use social media in different sociocultural contexts to create new digital counterpublics. The transnational perspective of each panellist will not only bring questions of how queerness is imagined, experienced and practiced through social media across borders, but also how it is restricted, controlled and turned into data by transnational social media platforms. By attending the panel, the audience will learn the empowering and yet limited potentials of transnational digital platforms for LGBTIQ+ people in places that include India, South Africa and Poland. The panel brings together social media researchers with expertise on different countries across the Global North and Global South with each of them focusing on an under-researched topic within academia. All presentations argue for going beyond methodological nationalism and highlight the importance of transnational analysis in social media studies. The panellists come from different disciplinary backgrounds including media studies, political science, sociology, computer science, linguistics, gender studies and digital humanities, which will provide vibrant interdisciplinary dialogue on how social media affects LGBTIQ+ people in different social contexts. The panel consists of emerging and established scholars, thereby opening the possibility for an intergenerational exchange.

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Panels

Panel: Analysing Controversies Amongst Online Music Communities

Lecture Theatre C

Jenessa Williams (University of Leeds), Edward Katrak Spencer (Queen Mary University of London) & Steven Gamble (University of Bristol)

The panel presents three interrelated investigations into controversial debates concerning music cultures on social media, with a shared research question: how do social media users negotiate allegations of music industry misconduct in the context of the culture wars? Our case studies are the fandoms of artists accused of sexual misconduct, the revival of the ‘Free Britney’ movement following the end of Britney Spears’ conservatorship, and Blackfishing accusations aimed at Ariana Grande. Given this scope, we engage closely with the complexities of #MeToo, online conspiracy theories, algorithmic outrage fatigue, and cultural appropriation. Our studies address online cultural activity across Reddit, Twitter/X, Tumblr, and TikTok, with a concern for platform idiosyncrasies as well as uncovering throughlines of controversial online discourse. The audience will be encouraged to participate in an extended and reflective Q&A. This will enable them to learn more about not just the subject matter of our papers, but how we might collectively explore the ethics of studying online culture wars, providing directives and discussion on our own negotiations of these highly contentious and often combative research environments.

Wed 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Panels

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm Posters & Reception

Posters & Reception

Upper Gallery

Here is a list of accepted posters

Wed 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Networking / Social, Posters

Thursday 18 Jul 2024

8:30 am - 9:00 am Registration & Coffee

Registration📋& Coffee☕

Upper Gallery

Please budget enough time for conference registration. We encourage you to explore the campus map before your arrival

Thu 8:30 am - 9:00 am
Networking / Social

9:00 am - 10:30 am Parallel Sessions 5

AI and Algorithms (1)

D105A/B

Session Moderator: David Crandall (Indiana University)

Exploring Non-Use Behavior in AI Customer Service: An Expectation Confirmation Theory Perspective Using a Sequential Mixed-Methods Approach | Yao Junchen, Dongqi Yan & Ren Wujiong (Beijing Normal University)

Fact or Story: Shaping Adolescents’ Perceptions of Video Gaming Through AI and Human Responses in Online Forums | Zhiying Yue, Samuel Schwamm, Michael Rich & David Bickham (Boston Children's Hospital)

Public Service Media’s Ethics Guidelines for the Design of AI-Technology in Journalism | Colin Porlezza (Università della Svizzera italiana) & Aljosha Karim Schapals (Queensland University of Technology)

Wading Through the “Black Box”: Algorithmic Impacts on Alternative Arab Digital Newsrooms’ Work | Azza El-Masri (University of Texas at Austin)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
AI and Algorithms

Discourse and Public Opinion (3)

D109

Session Moderator: Felipe Bonow Soares (London College of Communication)

Hashtag Hijacking as a New Way of Public Opinion Game: Zero-Sum or Variable-Sum? | Bei Zhao (Tianjin University), Ren Wujiong, Dongqi Yan & Hongzhong Zhang (Beijing Normal University)

Place and Partisan Connection: A Spatial Approach to Political Homophily | Abby Youran Qin, Wil Dubree & Michael Wagner (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Reddit’s Bot Inhabitants and Their Conflicts: From Proper Etiquette to "Bot Battles" and Beyond | Dominique Carlon (Queensland University of Technology)

Moral Network Agenda Setting _Network analysis of Moral Agendas Between Traditional Media and the Public on Reddit Taking the Example of Russia-Ukraine Conflict | Debao Xiang & Jinglin He (Beijing Foreign Studies University)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Discourse and Public Opinion

Use and Users (1)

D110

“I Give my Information, They Give me Free Entertainment and Learning Opportunities”: Sense-Making of, Feelings About, and Responses to Dataveillance on YouTube | Sarah Daoust-Braun, Noemi Festic & Michael Latzer (University of Zurich)

‘Ageing in the Digital Tsunami’: Exploring the Challenges Faced by Elderly-Micro-Influencer in China | Yingwen Wang (University of The Arts London) & Yanghui Cao (University College London)

Becoming Model Workers: The Positivity Paradox, Respectability Politics, and Working-Class Identity Performance on Chinese Video-Sharing Platforms | Miao Tian (Loughborough University)

Connect, Create, Consume: How are Young People Using Social Media? A Closer Look at the Culture of Social Media Use | Patrick Usmar (AUT University)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Use and Users

Health and Wellbeing (2)

Lecture Theatre A

Session Moderator: Kasia Kostyrka-Allchorne (Queen Mary University of London)

Breaking Free From Social Media: Enhancing Well-Being Through JoMO, Personality Dynamics and Demographic Factors | Tali Gazit & Tal Eitan (Bar-Ilan University)

Geospatial and Geosocial Dimensions of Foodborne Illness as Reflected in Yelp Restaurant Reviews | Eden Shaveet, Shayan Chowdhury, Daniel J. Hsu & Luis Gravano (Columbia University)

Invisible Horrors: The Enduring Impact of Black Death Online | Amanda M. McLeroy (University of Rochester) & Tiera Tanksley (UCLA)

Picturing Hereditary Cancer: Everyday Social Media Aesthetics of Health and Illness | Stefania Vicari, Hannah Ditchfield & Yu-Ning (Nock) Chuang (The University of Sheffield)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Health and Wellbeing

TikTok (3)

Lecture Theatre B

Shifting Landscapes of Political Communication: TikTok and the Video-Based Platform | Alia ElKattan (NYU)

Talking Environment on TikTok: Messages, Social Actors, and Engagement | Shreya Dube, Marijn Meijers, Edith Smit & Eline Smit (University of Amsterdam)

The Media Representations of Sentimental Relationships of the Neapolitan Generation Z in Tiktok: An Exploratory Analysis between Misogyny, Irony and Cultural Reproduction | Sabrina Bellafronte & Roberto Graziano (Università degli studi di Napoli Federico II)

The Nature and Effect of TikTok Political Contents | Shohana Ms. Akter & Pnina Fichman (Indiana University Bloomington)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
TikTok

Memes and Influencers (1)

Lecture Theatre C

“That’s the Brotherhood I Want”: Andrew Tate, Articulations of Community, and the Multilevel Marketing of Masculinities in the Manosphere | Anthony P. Kelly (University College Dublin)

In the Industry: Compliance in Influencer Relationship Management | Jenna Jacobson (Toronto Metropolitan University)

Navigating the Evil Eye: The Privacy Labor of Israeli Female Influencers | Alma Kalisky (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Online Barbie: Analyzing Backlash in Response to a Lifestyle Influencer's Identity Shift | Qianyu Wang & Chunyi Wu (University of Leeds)

Thu 9:00 am - 10:30 am
Memes and Influencers

10:30 am - 10:50 am Coffee Break

Coffee Break ☕ & Spin to Win 🎰

Upper Gallery

Thu 10:30 am - 10:50 am
Networking / Social

10:50 am - 11:50 am Parallel Sessions 6

Activism and Influence (1)

D105A/B

Session Moderator: Jackie Raphael-Luu (London College of Communication)

The Influence of Social Media Exposure on Heterosexuals’ Attitudes and Support for the LGBTQ+ Community | Lazar Dragic & Huang Xiaoyun (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Examining the Role of Innovation Attributes in Online Messages From Pro-innovation and Anti-innovation Opinion Leaders | Yanitza A. Cruz Crespo & Shannon Cruz (Pennsylvania State University)

Exploring Tensions in Contemporary Feminist Practices on Instagram | Sofia P. Caldeira (CICANT, Lusófona University)

Thu 10:50 am - 11:50 am
Activism and Influence

Discourse and Public Opinion (4)

D109

Session Moderator: Felipe Bonow Soares (London College of Communication)

The Greek News Paradox: High Online News Consumption In The Context of a Significant Digital Divide and Credibility Crisis | Michael Nevradakis (College Year in Athens)

#savewomenssports: A Network Analysis of its Origin, Influencers, and Anti-Trans Discourse | Travis R. Bell & Fan Yang (University of South Florida)

Unfixing the Shadows: Temporality in Social Media Photography of the War in Ukraine | Jennifer Good (UAL)

Thu 10:50 am - 11:50 am
Discourse and Public Opinion

Politics and Policy (2)

D110

Session Moderator: Harry T. Dyer (University of East Anglia)

The Ephemeral Face of Politics: Investigating Concentrated Visibility in Instagram Stories From the 2021 German Federal Election Campaign | Michael Achmann-Denkler (Universität Regensburg) & Christian Wolff (Regensburg University)

YouTube and Bing Chat: a Cross-Platform Analysis of the Filter Bubble Effect During the 2024 American Elections | Leonardo Sanna (Fondazione Bruno Kessler - FBK) & Salvatore Romano (AI Forensic)

Does Reasoning Style Interact With Message Features in the Evaluation of Persuasive Political Content on Social Media? Evidence From a Discrete Choice Experiment | Valentina Nerino (University of Bern)

Thu 10:50 am - 11:50 am
Politics and Policy

Panel: Re-Imagining AI with Afrofuturist Speculative Design

Lecture Theatre B

Sanjay Sharma and Kavin Narasimhan (University of Warwick), Anita Shervington and Juice Aleem (BLAST Fest, UK)

The objectives of the panel are to explore the challenges of developing technologies that serve the common good by centering the perspectives of marginalized groups: – To address the difficulty of unravelling AI technologies, and offer an innovative approach that encourages authentic and meaningful engagement with these complex sociotechnical systems. – To challenge existing power structures in the development of an ethics for AI technology that promotes racial equity and social justice. – To imagine possibilities that reclaim technologies and create alternative futures, which are empowering for communities traditionally excluded and marginalized. The panel consists of members of a project team (funded by a grant from the ESRC Digital Good Network), involving a collaboration between academic researchers and an activist community group. The academic researchers, Sanjay Sharma and Kavin Narasimhan, are in partnership with the third-sector community-based organization BLAST Fest, collaborating with its Director, Anita Shervington, and Creative Practitioner, Juice Aleem. BLAST Fest is a diverse group from the multicultural communities that the organization seeks to serve. It pursues social justice concerning issues of science and technology by creatively drawing on Black arts and culture. By using a ‘flipped-engagement’ approach, BLAST Fest centers the agency of communities in establishing agendas, areas of exploration, and forms of collaboration and knowledge co-production. Each of the panel members, via lightning talks and inter-group dialogue, will explore and present the outcomes of our research project, re-imagining AI through an Afrofuturist speculative perspective.

Thu 10:50 am - 11:50 am
Panels

Memes and Influencers (2)

Lecture Theatre C

Political Internet Memes: Fast-Food Media or Informative Appetizers? | Pietro Saccomanno (University of Milan & Collegio Carlo Alberto)

Putting on the Mask of “Annoying Dog”: NAFO's Memes Action During the Russia-Ukraine Conflict | Chen Siyu, Ren Wujiong (Beijing Normal University), Bei Zhao (Tianjin University), Zhang Hongzhong & Dongqi Yan (Beijing Normal University)

Social Media Influencers Save America? Investigating the Influence of Political Social Media Influencers on Political Engagement Among Millennials and Gen Z | Brandi A. Watkins (Virginia Tech)

Thu 10:50 am - 11:50 am
Memes and Influencers

12:00 pm - 12:45 pm Awards Ceremony & #SMSociety Next Chapter

AWARDS CEREMONY & #SMSOCIETY NEXT CHAPTER

Lecture Theatre A

Thu 12:00 pm - 12:45 pm

12:45 pm - 2:15 pm Lunch Break

Lunch Break 🍝 (not provided/self-organized)

off-campus

Here are some food options near the LCC

Thu 12:45 pm - 2:15 pm

2:15 pm - 3:45 pm Parallel Sessions 7

Activism and Influence (2)

D105A/B

Ghosted: A Social Media Visual Framing of Missing White Woman Syndrome: A Mixed Method Analysis of #LaurenCho, #DesheenaKyle, #MiyaMarcano, and #GabbyPetito | Jana M. Duckett, Aisha Powell, Sheri Booker, Joonwoo Moon & Lila Hopkins (Morgan State University)

The Community, Action, and Information Functions of Social Media Posts During the 2022 and 2023 Iranian Masha Amini Protests: A Cross-Platform Comparison of Posts by Activist Influencers on X (Formerly Twitter) and Instagram | Molly-Gloria Patel, Jinman Zhang, Zahra Falahatpisheh & Anabel Quan-Haase (Western University)

Stress, Appraisal, and Coping in Chinese Anti-Sexual Violence Feminist Activism on Social Media: A Platform Comparison of Weibo and Zhihu | Anabel Quan-Haase & Jinman Zhang (Western University)

An Investigation of Participatory Roles in the Social Media Activism Network: A Case Study of the #Marchforourlives Twitter Network | Miyoung Chong (University of South Florida)

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Activism and Influence

Anti-Social Behavior (3)

D109

Session Moderator: Felipe Bonow Soares (London College of Communication)

The Sociability of Online Antisocial Behaviour: A Study of how Toxic Interactions Manifest on a Colombian Telegram Group | Esteban Morales, Jaigris Hodson (Royal Roads University), Anatoliy Gruzd & Philip Mai (Toronto Metropolitan University)

Visualizing Violence: Analyzing Parler Images With Bertopic | Rod Abhari, Mowafak Allaham (Northwestern University), Ayse Lokmanoglu (Clemson University), Chloe Mortenson & Esteban Villa-Turek (Northwestern University)

Online Harms as ‘Part of the Job’: Understanding Public-Facing Professionals’ Experiences Online | Marcel Obst, Petra S. Bayerl & Martin Snowden (CENTRIC)

Women’s Shrinking Political Space on Twitter: An Autoethnography From India | Sanjukta Basu

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Anti-Social Behavior

Use and Users (2)

D110

Decision-Making Process for News & Non-Personal Content Sharing on Social Media | Lola Y.C. Wong & Jacquleyn Burkell (University of Western Ontario)

Social Media Influencers and Consumer Behavior: A Study of Online Shopping Trends among Saudi Women | Hadeel Alhomaid (Lancaster University)

Unveiling and Social Media Use and Perception Among Muslim Women | Aysha Agbarya (The Open University)

Graduate Students Navigating the Intricacies of Using Social Media for Professional and Academic Development | Enilda Romero-Hall, Emily Allen (University of Tennessee Knoxville) & Lina Gomez-Vasquez (University of Tampa)

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Use and Users

Health and Wellbeing (3)

Lecture Theatre A

Session Moderator: Nic DePaula (SUNY Polytechnic Institute)

From Worry About Cancer to Trust in Health System: The Moderating Role of Perceived Misleading Information on Social Media | Xueyan Cao (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Live Streaming as a New Mode of Health Communication: The Felicitousness of Interaction in Breast Cancer Awareness Campaigns | Basma Salem, Paula Saukko & Jessica Robles (Loughborough University)

Digital Afterlives: An Exploratory Study into Death, Grief, and Memorialisation on Social Media Platforms | Nilou Davoudi (University of British Columbia)

Anxiety is not Cute. Analysis of Twitter Users' Discourses on Romanticizing Mental Illness | Ebenzer Ato K. Aidoo (University of Iowa), Barikisu Issaka (Michigan State University), Sandra Wood (Arizona State University) & Fatima Mohammed (University of North Carolina)

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Health and Wellbeing

Politics and Policy (3)

Lecture Theatre B

Noises in the Dark: Power, Protest, and Participatory Policymaking in Online Platforms | Brittany Melton & Alissa Centivany (Western University)

Social Media Policies as Social Control in the Newsroom | Longhan Wei (Chinese University of Hong Kong), Shuning Lu (North Dakota State University) & Hai Liang (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Let the Authority Beat the “Little Third”: Analyzing Three Contradictions in China’s Shifting Gender Politics Through the CP Fan Conflicts of Detective Conan on Weibo | Mian Wei, Jiayun Ye (University of Wisconsin-Madison) & Dongdong Yang (University of Connecticut)

The Changing Nature of Social Media and Research Impact: A Comparative Analysis of Impact Case Studies in UK Higher Education, 2014-2021 | Mark Carrigan (University of Manchester), Katy Jordan (Lancaster University) & Ignacio Wyman (University of Manchester)

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Politics and Policy

Growing Up Online (2)

Lecture Theatre C

Session Moderator: Zoetanya Sujon (London College of Communication)

Permission, Privacy and Parenting: Negotiating Family Online Sharing | Rose Capdevila, Lisa Lazard, Gemma Ballard (The Open University), Charlotte Dann (University of Northampton), Abigail Locke (Keele University), Sandra Roper (University of Bedfordshire) & Cliff Manning (ParentZone)

Adolescents’ Everyday Emotions on Social Media: Why do They Feel Guilty? | Daeun Jung (Florida State University) & Vanessa Dennen (Florida State University)

TYKES – Towards Developing Understandings of Young Kid’s Digital Literacies in the Early Years Foundation Stage | Harry T. Dyer, Simon Hammond & Laura C. Jennings-Tallant (UEA)

Thu 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Growing Up Online

3:45 pm - 4:05 pm Coffee Break

Coffee Break ☕

Upper Gallery

Thu 3:45 pm - 4:05 pm
Networking / Social

4:05 pm - 5:25 pm Parallel Sessions 8

Health and Wellbeing (4)

D105A/B

Session Moderator: Lucía Magis-Weinberg (University of Washington)

Personal and Non-Personal Health Information - A Comparative Study of Public Presentations of Six (Mental) Health Conditions on YouTube | Annika Deubel (Center for Advanced Internet Studies) & Katrin Weller (GESIS)

Insta-Memorializing: Instagram Posts About Memorials as Eudaemonic Media | Derek S. Foster (Brock University)

Social Media Fatigue and Intention to Use Weibo Secondary Accounts: An Empirical Study Based on Stressor-Strain-Outcome Framework | Fangqing Lu (University of Amsterdam)

Do Comments Affect Me? The Effects of Instagram Comments of Thin-Ideal Images on Females’ Body Image Concerns | Qinyu Cheng (The Education University of Hong Kong)

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm
Health and Wellbeing

Digital Methods (2)

D109

Session Moderator: Felipe Bonow Soares (London College of Communication)

The Social (Media) Contract Over Time: A Longitudinal Analysis of TOUs | Kaspar Beelen (University of London), Katie A. Ireland & Tim Samples (University of Georgia)

Unveiling Echo Chambers on YouTube With Inferential Network Analysis | Claudia Zucca, Roman Nekrasov, Huub van de Voort, Andy Huang, Oumaima Lemhour, Tom Teurlings & Steven van den Oord (Tilburg University)

Authenticity in Synthetic Media: The Theory of Content Consistency and AI Multi-Modal Fake News Detection | Regina Luttrell, Jason L. Davis & Carrie Welch (Syracuse University)

Semiotics as a Bridge Between Natural Language Processing and the Study of Online Polarization | Kate S. O'Connor Farfan (Queensland University of Technology)

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm
Digital Methods

Use and Users [3]

D110

Session Moderator: Zoetanya Sujon (London College of Communication)

“The Views Expressed Here are my Own and in no Way Reflect the Views of the University”: An Analysis of Social Media Policies in UK Higher Education Institutions | Katy Jordan (Lancaster University) & Mark Carrigan (University of Manchester)

Canadians’ Uses and Gratifications of Social Media During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Latent Class Analysis | Lyndsay Foisey (Western University), Andrew Nevin (University of Massachusetts Boston) & Anabel Quan-Haase (Western University)

Knowing Your Users by Heart. A Critical Analysis of Social Media Platforms' Scientific Research on Emotions | Camille Alloing (Université du Québec à Montréal), Julien Pierre (Sherbrooke University), Elsa Fortant (Université du Québec à Montréal) & Rémi Palissier (Sherbrooke University)

How Product Presentation in Live Streaming Enhances Consumer Purchase Intention | Shiu-Li Huang & Hsin-Ju Wang (National Taipei University)

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm

Panel: Selling Play and Perfection in the Digital Imaginaries of Young People

Lecture Theatre A

Natalie Coulter (York University), Beatriz Feijoo (UNIR International University of Rioja), Patricia Núñez-Gómez (Complutense University of Madrid) & Lidia Marôpo (Instituto Politécnico de Setúbal & CICS.NOVA)

*The work presented at the panel was conducted in collaboration with Ana Jorge (CICANT, Lusófona University), Francisca Porfírio (CICANT, Lusófona University), Patrícia Dias (Catholic University of Portugal).

The panel consists of three papers that are thematically connected. Each centers around young people and their families’ engagement with social media. Together they forge a larger argument that teases out the tensions between young people’s social media use and the pressures of commercialization. The papers question how the discursive cadences of social media content impact the lived experiences of young people and their families. As well as how the commercial affordances of social media shape the way that young people engage with the content. By presenting these three papers in conversation with each other, the panel hopes to push for a broader understanding of how such social concepts of play and perfection are shaped by the digital imaginaries of young people under the pressures of digital capitalism.

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm
Panels

TikTok (4)

Lecture Theatre B

TikTok War Humor: About the Social and Psychological Functions of Humor Videos Posted Online as War Unfolds | Hananel Rosenberg, Nili Steinfeld & Michal Mahat-Shamir (Ariel University)

What Occurs as #news on TikTok? A Computational Approach | Jonathan Hendrickx (University of Vienna), Lion Wedel & Anna-Theresa Mayer (Weizenbaum Institut)

Multimodal Analysis of Mental Health Rhetoric on TikTok | Ammina Kothari (University of Rhode Island), Rana Hassan (Independent Researcher) & Alejandra Josiowicz (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro)

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm
TikTok

Online and Offline Communities (4)

Lecture Theatre C

Session Moderator: Adrienne Hall-Phillips (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

Exploring Science Communication on Community-Oriented Social Media | Seung Woo Chae, Noriko Hara & Eugene Kim (Indiana University)

R/Antiwork and the Infrapolitics of Workplace Resistance | Ari Stillman (University of Edinburgh)

Online Communities About Generative AI: Supporting Knowledge Production Through Algorithmic Gossip | Brennan Antone (Cornell University)

Thu 4:05 pm - 5:25 pm
Online and Offline Communities